The Rapidian

Trans Day of Visibility enters ninth year of observance

TDoV is an annual holiday celebrated around the globe, dedicated to celebrating the successes and accomplishments of trans and gender non-conforming people, while also raising awareness of the work that is still needed to save trans lives.
Three trans individuals pose with a transgender pride flag in downtown GR.

Three trans individuals pose with a transgender pride flag in downtown GR. /Finn Marcks

Underwriting support from:
TDoV Graphic for GRTrans Foundation

TDoV Graphic for GRTrans Foundation /Finn Marcks

As March 31st fast approaches, International Transgender Day of Visibility will be celebrating its ninth year of observance.  

TDoV is an annual holiday celebrated around the globe, dedicated to celebrating the successes and accomplishments of trans and gender non-conforming people, while also raising awareness of the work that is still needed to save trans lives. The holiday was founded by Rachel Crandall of Michigan in 2009 due to the lack of positive LGBT holidays, and as a contrasting holiday to the much more solemn Trans Day of Remembrance that is observed every November which honors those we have lost.

Trans people, now more than ever, need your love and support. We are facing a hostile political climate that devalues our existence and rights daily. Chances are you know someone who is trans, whether you’re aware of it or not, as many of us remain hidden to protect ourselves. Visibility can be deadly for some. 

Today is but a single day you can show your support and love. You must realize that we need support 365 days out of the year.

What can you do? 

The Grand Rapids Trans Foundation is always accepting donations, and I encourage you to take a look at their website. They are a nonprofit organization helping the Grand Rapids Trans Community achieve their academic goals.  

The GR Pride Center is also always looking for volunteers and donations. These are just a few ideas. 

On this day, we celebrate all trans people, visible or otherwise. We celebrate our trans siblings who live openly and authentically, and those who are unable to. The fight is far from over, and I hope to see you standing beside me and my trans siblings in the future.

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