The Rapidian

GRAM Announces First Major American Impressionism Exhibition in over a Decade

This dispatch was added by one of our Nonprofit Neighbors. It does not represent the editorial voice of The Rapidian or Community Media Center.

In A New Light: American Impressionism 1870 ‑1940 l Works from the Bank of America Collection on view June 11 -  Aug 27

/E. Martin Hennings (American, 1886–1956). Two Summer Riders, c. 1930s. Oil on Canvas, 30 ¼ x 30 ¼ inches. Bank of America Collection.

Underwriting support from:

Meijer Free Days at the Grand Rapids Art Museum

Enjoy free admission to GRAM on Tuesdays (12 - 6 pm) and Thursday nights (5 - 9 pm). Made possible by the Meijer Foundation.

/Philip Little (American, 1857–1942). Untitled (Landscape with Water and Trees), 1925. Oil on canvas, 38 ¼ x 60 inches. Bank of America Collection

The Grand Rapids Art Museum (GRAM) recently announced the opening of In A New Light: American Impressionism 1870 – 1940 | Works from the Bank of America Collection, on view at the Museum from June 11 through August 27, 2022. The sweeping survey of 130 paintings, prints, and drawings traces the emergence and evolution of the American Impressionism movement during the mid-19th to early 20th century. 

Featuring works from acclaimed artists such as George Inness, Lilla Cabot Perry, Childe Hassam, Thomas Moran, John Sloan, Theresa Bernstein, Ernest Lawson, and Guy Carleton Wiggins, the exhibition explores how artists interpreted America’s rural, urban, and maritime spaces.

Impressionism is one of the most popular and enduring artistic styles, and this exhibition celebrates its unique American expression,” commented GRAM Assistant Curator Jennifer Wcisel. ​Visitors to the Grand Rapids Art Museum will see beautiful paintings of the American landscape, from the windswept shores of the East Coast to the snow-capped mountains and the brilliant deserts of the West, all captured with the brisk brush strokes and vibrant palette of Impressionism.”

In A New Light focuses on the regional artist colonies that were crucial to the evolution of the American Impressionist style, spanning the Northeast to the Midwest and the American West. These collaborative enclaves offered a tranquil place for artists to share ideas and resources, surrounded by the great natural beauty that inspired their works, not far from growing urban centers. 

Comprised of landscapes, seascapes, city scenes, portraits, and still lifes, the exhibition is made up of works from the Bank of America Collection, loaned to the Museum through their Art in our Communities® initiative. 

Bank of America is committed to helping arts and culture programming flourish in Grand Rapids by bringing an exhibition, In A New Light: American Impressionism 1870 – 1940 to the Grand Rapids Art Museum for residents and visitors to enjoy,” said Renee Tabben, President Bank of America Grand Rapids. ​Through Bank of America’s Art in our Communities program, we are able to give our community the opportunity to see these important works of art that educate, enrich, and inspire.” 

The Art in our Communities® program is the only corporate program of its kind that allows museums and nonprofit galleries to borrow Bank of America exhibitions at no cost. It provides the public with the opportunity to see important works of art while at the same time generating vital revenue for participating institutions. Since 2009, more than 140 museums worldwide have borrowed exhibitions through Art in our Communities.

In A New Light is organized geographically by the art colonies and regional schools that disseminated Impressionism across the United States. The exhibition also provides historical context by introducing the artistic movements that came immediately before and after. The American Landscape and the Hudson River School explores the emergence of the first true artistic movement in America, The Introduction of the Barbizon School to America continues to reflect the changing mindsets of the country and the introduction of creating works en plein air or ​in the open air,” American Artistic Study and Training in Europe explored a desire to transpose the long-developed history and training of European artistic masters into a uniquely American style, Art Colonies and Regional Schools tracks the emergence of individual regional styles, influenced by the landscapes unique to the surrounding land and environment, and After Impressionism: The Eight and American Realism concludes with works created in response to Impressionism after American artists grew restless with the style that came to define an era of America now passed. 

Related Events:

Member Exhibition Opening: In A New Light
Grand Rapids Art Museum
Friday, June 10
7 – 9 pm
GRAM Members and their guests are invited to celebrate the opening of In A New Light at the Grand Rapids Art Museum. Join us for a special advance viewing of the exhibition, accompanied by hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar.

This exhibition has been loaned through the Bank of America Art in our Communities® program. Presenting support is generously provided by Bank of America, with additional support by the Wege Foundation, Michigan Arts and Culture Council, National Endowment for the Arts, and Lead Exhibition Society Sponsor Daniel and Pamella DeVos Foundation. Additional support provided by the GRAM Exhibition Society.

About the Grand Rapids Art Museum 
Connecting people through art, creativity, and design. Established in the heart of downtown Grand Rapids, the art museum is internationally known for its distinguished design and LEED® Gold certified status. Established in 1910 as the Grand Rapids Art Association, GRAM has grown to include more than 6,000 works of art, including American and European 19th and 20th-century painting and sculpture and more than 3,000 works on paper. Embracing the city’s legacy as a leading center of design and manufacturing, GRAM has a growing collection in the area of design and modern craft. 

For museum hours and admission fees, call 616.831.1000 or visit artmuseumgr.org.

About Bank of America 
At Bank of America, we’re guided by a common purpose to help make financial lives better, through the power of every connection. We’re delivering on this through responsible growth with a focus on our environmental, social and governance (ESG) leadership. ESG is embedded across our eight lines of business and reflects how we help fuel the global economy, build trust and credibility, and represent a company that people want to work for, invest in and do business with. It’s demonstrated in the inclusive and supportive workplace we create for our employees, the responsible products and services we offer our clients, and the impact we make around the world in helping local economies thrive. An important part of this work is forming strong partnerships with nonprofits and advocacy groups, such as community, consumer and environmental organizations, to bring together our collective networks and expertise to achieve greater impact.

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