The Rapidian

Sweeping Republican wins in Michigan turn state red

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Voters on Tuesday elected republicans to a majority of state and federal positions..

Voters on Tuesday elected republicans to a majority of state and federal positions.. /David Guthrie

The Tuesday, Nov. 2 general election saw Republicans taking the most votes in many races from the governor's seat on down.

The State of Michigan's new governor elect is Republican Rick Snyder, of Ann Arbor, who garnered 136,246 votes, more than that of his competitors combined. Democrat Virg Bernero, of Lansing, took 58,002 votes; Green Party candidate Harley Mikkelson, of Caro, took 1,036; U.S. Taxpayers candidate Stacey Mathia, of Grand Rapids, won 1,011; and Libertarian Ken Proctor, of Charlotte, took 1,444.

The lieutenant governor position will be filled by Snyder's running mate, Republican Brian N. Calley, of Portland.

Republican Ruth Johnson will be Michigan's next secretary of state for four years, taking the race with 119,235 votes. Democrat Jocelyn Michelle Benson, of Detroit, took 68,602 votes; Green Party candidate John Anthony La Pietre, of Marshall, won 1,582 votes; U.S. Taxpayers candidate Robert Gale, of Sterling Heights, took 1,937 votes; and Libertarian Scotty Boman, of Detroit, garnered 3,793 votes.

Taking the four-year attorney general position was Republican Bill Schuette, of Midland, with 12,131 votes. Libertarian Daniel Grow, of St. Joseph, won 3,994 votes; U.S. Taxpayers candidate Gerald T. Van Sickle, of Wellston, took 2,561 votes; and Democrat David Leyton, of Flint, took 66,081 votes.

In the race to be Michigan's 3rd District Representative in Congress, a two-year position, Republican Justin Amash, of Grand Rapids, took the most votes with 111,247. Democrat Pat Miles, of Grand Rapids, won 72,224 votes; Green Party candidate Charlie Shick, of Wyoming, took 1,242 votes; U.S. Taxpayers candidate Ted Gerrard, of Grand Rapids, garnered 1,538 votes; and Libertarian James Rogers, of Rockford, won 2,065 votes.

Michigan's 28th District State Senator seat, a four-year term, was taken by Republican Mark C. Jansen, of Grand Rapids, with 76,655 votes, while Democrat Robin Golden, of Wyoming, took 27,257, and Libertarian Jamie Lewis, of Grand Rapids, took 3,144.

The 29th District State Senator seat, a four-year term, was won by Republican Dave Hildenbrand, of Grand Rapids, with 41,038 votes. Democrat David LaGrand, of Grand Rapids, took 36,821 votes and Libertarian Bill Gelineau, of Lowell, won 1,406.

The two-year-termed position of 73rd District State Representative was won by Republican Peter MacGregor, of Rockford, with 28,526 votes. Democrat Jerrod C. Roberts, of Cedar Springs, took 10,062 votes and Libertarian Ron Heeren, of Grand Rapids, took 1,261.

The seat of Michigan's 75th District State Representative, a two-year-term, will go to Democrat Brandon Dillon, who garnered 13,678 votes in the election. Republican Bing Goei, of Grand Rapids, won 13,012 votes and Libertarian Larry DeLeon, also of Grand Rapids, took 462.

The 76th District State Representative seat, a two-year-termed position, will remain in the hands of Democrat Roy Schmidt, of Grand Rapids, who won 11,678 votes. Republican Marc A. Tonnemacher, of Grand Rapids, took 5,931 votes, while Libertarian Matthew L. Friar, of Grand Rapids, took 389 and U.S. Taxpayers candidate Bill Mohr, also of Grand Rapids, won 352.

The 86th District State Representative seat, a two-year term, was won by Republican Lisa Posthumus Lyons, of Alto, with 25,943 votes. Democrat Frank A. Hammond, of Walker, took 10,996 votes and Libertarian Robin VanLoon, of Grand Rapids, won 909.

Elected to the Kent County Commission Tuesday were Republican Theodore J. Vonk in the 1st District, Republican Thomas Antor in the 2nd District, Republican Roger C. Morgan in the 3rd District, Republican Gary Rolls in the 4th District, unopposed Republican Sandra Frost Parrish in the 5th District, Republican Michael Wawee, Jr. in the 6th District, Republican Stan Ponstein in the 7th District, Republican Jack D. Boelema in the 8th District, Republican Harold J. Voorhees in the 9th District, Republican Bill Hirsch in the 10th District, Republican Jim Saalfield in the 11th District, Republican Harold J. Mast in the 12th District, Republican Richard A. Vander Molen in the 13th District, Democrat Carol M. Hennessy in the 14th District, Democrat Dick Bulkowski in the 15th District, Democrat Jim Talen in the 16th District, Democrat Candace E. Chivis in the 17th District, Republican Dan Koorndyk in the 18th District, and Republican Shana Shroll in the 19th District.

Republicans Eileen Weiser and Richard Zeile were elected to the State Board of Education. Republicans Andrea Fischer Newman and Andrew C. Richner were elected to the University of Michigan Board of Regents. Republicans Brian Breslin and Mitch Lyons were elected to the Michigan State University Board of Trustees. And open positions on the Wayne State University Board of Governors were won by Republicans Diane Dunaskiss and Danialle Karmanos.

Two positions on the State Supreme Court were won by Mary Beth Kelly and Bob Young.

State Proposal 10-1, which would have convened a constitutional convention, was defeated 126,863-56,215.

State Proposal 10-2, which bans felons from holding certain public offices and positions, passed 141,403-45,224.

Vote tallies and other information used in this story was taken from Election Magic.

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