The Rapidian

Seasons Change, Colors Burst Forth in Commercial District

Underwriting support from:
Nathan Goddard's "Should Be Culture" at 1309 Plainfield NE

Nathan Goddard's "Should Be Culture" at 1309 Plainfield NE

On Monday, September 21st, the Creston Neighborhood Association (CNA) unveiled its newest murals.

Through a competitive selection process, CNA chose internationally recognized Creston artists, Michael Pfleghaar and Nathan Goddard, to create works which add a stronger sense of community and ownership for those living and working in a valuable Northeast neighborhood of Grand Rapids.

The Creston Public Art Initiative is a multi-year project that seeks to create public art within the Creston Business District on Plainfield Avenue just north of Leonard Street.

The murals were made possible with grant funding from the Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC). LISC is a national not-for-profit that connects ideas with capital, providing training, technical assistance, and financing to help neighbors build sustainable communities. Michigan LISC helps make neighborhoods stronger.

Nathan Goddard's "Should Be Culture" which graces the northern facade of Jimmy's Ribs, is inspired by different aspects of culture in Grand Rapids and by artists embedded in our rich world history including Mondrian, Warhol, and Magritte. Viewing the mural, one will notice the giant paint brushes. "I see Creston as a work in progress, building community one neighbor and public art work at a time," said Goddard.

"Into the Garden" by Michael Pfleghaar depicts an entrance into a hidden garden through cypress trees and iron gates. "I wanted to create something inspired by the architecture around the old bricked-up doorway (on the Spencer Street side of Plainfield United Methodist Church)," said Pfleghaar. "A perfect solution was to use it as a gateway or window into a garden."

Deborah Eid, Executive Director of CNA states, "These are great complements to the UICA Artworks mural we installed at the Bradley Salon. Now people see art traveling north or south in our neighborhood!"

"Art slows down traffic so people are able to be reintroduced to their communities," said Tommy Allen, CNA Board Member and public art liaison. "People who walk our neighborhood streets will benefit more since, as with all art, the more you spend time with it, the greater understanding you have for art's secret language."

Get re-introduced. Take in new art. Experience architecture in a new way. Enjoy a neighborhood commercial district.

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