The Rapidian

The Salvation Army & Walmart Team Together to "Stuff the Bus"

This dispatch was added by one of our Nonprofit Neighbors. It does not represent the editorial voice of The Rapidian or Community Media Center.

The Salvation Army Joins Forces With Walmart to “Stuff the Bus” for Kids in Need, as community members donate school supplies for local children returning to school during the pandemic – whether online or in the classroom
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The Salvation Army & Walmart STUFF THE BUS Event on Aug.7-9 2020

Join efforts in supporting school children this weekend, as The Salvation Army and Walmart join together to collect school supplies for hundreds of childrfen in our community. All items will be collected and distributed to needy families on Aug.15 at Fulton Heights Citadel located on 1235 Fulton Street East. We thank everyone for their generous support.

/Mika Roinila

/Mika Roinila

Walmart stores in Grand Rapids and The Salvation Army are teaming up to provide new school supplies to dozens and dozens of local children in need during the “Stuff the Bus” campaign event at all Grand Rapids Walmart locations on August 7-9, 2020.

For kids preparing for the upcoming school year, school supplies remain critical to their success. In light of COVID-19, The Salvation Army has adapted its services to ensure that children in every community can continue receiving the educational support they deserve. This year, the “Stuff the Bus” campaign event in Grand Rapids is one of more than 4,500 similar events taking place at Walmart stores across the country. When shoppers visit Walmart on August 7-9, they can purchase and drop off requested items at Salvation Army collection bins located inside each store.

“There are countless children across Kent County and within Grand Rapids whose parents will have to make the tough choice between school supplies, groceries, the electric bill or insurance,” said Auxiliary Captain Mika Roinila from The Salvation Army. “Last year, we helped some 250 children receive backpacks and school supplies.We anticipate this number will increase significantly this year due to the novel coronavirus.”

Since the beginning of the pandemic, The Salvation Army has provided more than 65 million meals through a combination of prepared meals and food boxes, 1.45 million nights of safe shelter, and emotional and spiritual support to more than 778,000 people, in addition to the financial assistance, hygiene kits, and youth programs the organization provides in almost every ZIP code in America.

Walmart and The Salvation Army have collaborated for more than 30 years in an effort to meet local community needs. Supporters like Walmart help The Salvation Army serve more than 23 million Americans each year through a range of social services that help them overcome poverty and economic hardships.

All donations made at “Stuff the Bus” campaign events will remain in the community to help The Salvation Army provide back-to-school support to local children in need.

To learn more and find out how you can get involved with your local Salvation Army, visit https://centralusa.salvationarmy.org/fultonheights/

About The Salvation Army

The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operations around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood

 

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